DIGITAL HUMANITIES DAY AT
THE BRITISH LIBRARY


 

LEARN HOW LEADING SCHOLARS AROUND THE WORLD ARE FORGING NEW HUMANITIES RESEARCH PATHS WITH DIGITAL HUMANITIES.

With significant advances in accessibility of data and computing power, more and more academic institutions are realising the potential to expand the scope of their humanities offering by supporting research in, and teaching of, Digital Humanities.

On 2nd May 2019 we hosted our inaugural DH Day at the British Library. A diverse and popular line up of speakers representing DH scholarship and academic libraries from around the world including North America, Japan, Australia and the UK, presented the international scope of digital humanities research; how it is being applied to large content sets like newspapers, how it is being taught in the classroom and what the library is doing to support DH within their institutions.

In addition, we heard how academic/corporate partnerships are helping fund innovation, provide access to big datasets and promote standards in both data and pedagogy through initiatives like the Gale Digital Scholar Lab to make Digital Humanities available to everyone, regardless of experience.

  • SPEAKERS:

      JULIANNE NYHAN

     

     

    ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF DIGITAL INFORMATION STUDIES | UCL, UK

     

      JORIS VAN EIJNATTEN

     

     

    FULL PROFESSOR OF CULTURAL HISTORY AND CHAIR | UTRECHT UNIVERSITY, NETHERLANDS

     

      LISA MCINTOSH

     

     

    DIRECTOR ACCESS SERVICES | UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY LIBRARY,  AUSTRALIA


      MARK ALGEE-HEWITT

     

     

    DIRECTOR OF THE STANFORD LITERARY LAB & ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH AND DIGITAL HUMANITIES | STANFORD UNIVERSITY, USA

     

      MELODEE BEALS

     

     

    LECTURER IN DIGITAL HISTORY | LOUGHBOROUGH UNIVERSITY, UK


      TOMOJI TABATA

     

     

    ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LANGUAGE TECHNOLOGY | OSAKA UNIVERSITY, JAPAN


      RYAN CORDELL

     

     

    ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH | NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY, USA

     

      SARAH KETCHLEY

     

     

    LECTURER AND PROFESSOR IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES & EGYPTOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, USA
     

  • AGENDA

    Coffee and Registration: 9.30 -10.00

    Welcome and Opening remarks: 10.00 - 10.10

    Session 1 Literature & Distant Reading 

    'Microgenres: Models of Disciplinarity in the Novel' | Mark Algee-Hewitt 10.10 - 10.50

    and 

    'Reading texts non-linearly: Classic British fiction and Dickens' | Tomoji Tabata 10.50 - 11.30

    Questions 11.30 - 11.35 

    Chair: Seth Cayley

    Break: 11.35 - 11.50

    Session 2 Computers Reading the News 

    'Unexpected uses of heritage and historical data'  | Melodee Beals 11.50 - 12.30

    and

    ‘On Principles and Values. Mining for Conservative Rhetoric in the London Times, 1785-2010’ | Joris van Eijnatten 12.30 - 13.10

    Questions 13.10 - 13.15

    Chair: Chris Houghton 

    Lunch: 13.15 - 14.00

    Session 3 Digital Humanities in the Classroom

    ‘Introducing Digital Humanities in the Undergraduate Classroom: Strategies, Solutions and Pedagogical Practices using Gale Digital Scholar Lab’ | Sarah Ketchley 14.00 - 14.35

    and 

    'Teaching Humanistic Data Analysis' | Ryan Cordell 14.35 - 15.15

    Questions 15.15 - 15.20

    Chair: Nicholas Berg

    Break: 15.20 - 15.40

    Session 4 Institutional support and infrastructure for Digital Humanities 

    'Reflections on infrastructures for mining nineteenth century newspaper data' |  Julianne Nyhan 15.40 - 16.20

    and

    'Recycle, Reuse, Repurpose. Building Library capacity to support digital research at the University of Sydney' | Lisa McIntosh 16.20 - 16.40

    Questions 16.40 - 16.50 

    Chair: Marc Cormier

    Closing remarks: 16.50 - 17.00 

 

   Where to find the Knowledge Centre Theatre at The British Library: