Archives Unbound: African Studies

Covering a critical period of colonialism (1910-1940), this collection brings together primary source materials that enlighten the study of politics, culture, and history. It provides particular insight into German, Italian, British, Portuguese, and American influences as the world advanced toward World War II.

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  • African Studies

    Egypt: Records of the U.S. Department of State, 1853-1962 - This archive covers Egypt from the years before the opening of the Suez Canal through the era of British domination, Arab nationalism, and independence. The documents here are sourced from the Central Files of the General Records of the Department of State. The records are under the jurisdiction of the Legislative and Diplomatic Branch of the Civil Archives, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.

    Evangelism in Africa: Correspondence of the Board of Foreign Missions, 1835-1910 - The records of the Board of Foreign Missions (BFM) of the Presbyterian church provide valuable information on social conditions in developing Third World nations and on efforts to spread the gospel during the nineteenth century. Among the missions' responsibilities was the establishment of indigenous churches, educational facilities, hospitals, orphanages, and seminaries. The majority of materials is incoming correspondence from the mission field and outgoing correspondence from the Board headquarters. Other primary sources include diary accounts, sermon manuscripts, receipts of sale, and field accounts. 

    King and the People in Morocco, 1950-1959 - Morocco’s strategic location has shaped its history. After gaining independence in 1956, Morocco made great strides toward economic and political liberalization. Sultan Muhammad V, ruling his newly independent nation, proclaimed his intention of turning it into a constitutional monarchy. His first act was to transform himself into a monarch and assume the title of king. The Moroccan government undertook several economic, social, and political reforms, including the drafting of a constitution.

    Liberation Movement in Africa and African America - This archive is based on the film title, Administrative Histories of the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidency, Science and Technology.

    Liberia and the U.S.: Nation-Building in Africa, 1864-1918 - This series consists of correspondence and telegrams received and sent by the United States diplomatic post in Liberia. The topics covered by these records include all aspects of relations with Liberia and interactions of American citizens with the Liberian government and people.

    Liberia and the U.S.: Nation-Building in Africa, 1918-1935 - This archive serves as a companion to Liberia and the U.S.: Nation-Building in Africa, 1864-1918. It consists of correspondence and telegrams received and sent by American diplomats, as well as records of American citizens and companies with relations to Liberia. It carries the story from the end of the First World War into the interwar period. 

    Libya: Records of the U.S. Department of State, 1796-1885 - This archive documents the American consulate in Tripoli. Included here are correspondences of Secretary of State James Madison during the Tripolitan War, 1801-1805, between the United States and the piratical North African Barbary States. Handwritten correspondences from Secretary of State William H. Seward in the Lincoln Administration, relating to the opening of the port of New Orleans in 1862, and exchanges from Secretary of State James G. Blaine, in the Garfield Administration, make this a rich resource in U.S. diplomatic history. The collection is sourced from the Central Files of the General Records of the Department of State. The records are under the jurisdiction of the Legislative and Diplomatic Branch of the Civil Archives, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.

    Morocco: Records of the U.S. Department of State, 1797-1929 - This archive reveals more than a century of U.S.-Morocco relations and includes, among various documents, correspondences from U.S. ministers in Tangier and Tetuan. It is sourced from the Central Files of the General Records of the Department of State. The records are under the jurisdiction of the Legislative and Diplomatic Branch of the Civil Archives, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.

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