Thorndike Press
NEW

Clap When You Land

  • Elizabeth Acevedo
  • Offered By: Thorndike Striving Reader
  • ISBN-10: 1432881523
  • ISBN-13: 9781432881528
  • DDC: Fic
  • Shipping Weight: 1.55 lbs ( .70 kgs)
  • 596 Pages | Hardcover
  • Published/Released September 2020

About

Overview

A New York Times Bestselling Author
A National Book Award-Winning Author
A Michael L. Printz Award-Winning Author
A Pura Belpré Award-Winning Author
A Boston Globe–Horn Book Award-Winning Author
A Walter Award-Winning Author
A Today show pick for “25 children’s books your kids and teens won’t be able to put down this summer!”

Camino Rios lives for the summers when her father visits her in the Dominican Republic. But this time, on the day when his plane is supposed to land, Camino arrives at the airport to see crowds of crying people . . .

In New York City, Yahaira Rios is called to the principal’s office, where her mother is waiting to tell her that her father, her hero, has died in a plane crash.

Separated by distance — and Papi’s secrets — the two girls are forced to face a new reality in which their father is dead and their lives are forever altered.

And then, when it seems like they’ve lost everything of their father, they learn of each other.

Age Range: 14-17 | Grade Level: 9-12 | Lexile Measure: HL800L

Reviews

Customer Reviews

“Tackles family secrets, toxic masculinity, and socio-economic differences with incisive clarity and candor . . . Every line is laced with betrayal and longing as the teens struggle with loving someone despite his imperfections. A standing ovation.”

— Kirkus Reviews (starred)

“Returning to verse, Acevedo subtly, skillfully uses language and rhythm to give voice to the sisters’ grief, anger, and uncertainty; Camino’s introspective openness; and Yahaira’s tendency toward order and leadership. Raw and emotional, Acevedo’s exploration of loss packs an effective double punch, unraveling the aftermath of losing a parent alongside the realities of familial inheritance.”

— Publishers Weekly (starred)

“Acevedo’s free verse poems for each girl share an easy cadence and thoughtfulness, yet each girl’s perspective is clear: Camino is strong but fearful of the dangers that threaten her life and hopes; Yahaira’s anger is palpable, but so is her tenderness and love for her girlfriend Dre. . . . Memorable for its treatment of grief, depiction of family ties, and lyrical strength, expect a well-deserved high demand.”

— Booklist (starred)