Thorndike Press
NEW

Prairie Lotus

  • Linda Sue Park
  • Offered By: Thorndike Striving Reader
  • ISBN-10: 1432883240
  • ISBN-13: 9781432883249
  • DDC: Fic
  • Shipping Weight: .95 lbs ( .43 kgs)
  • 312 Pages | Hardcover
  • Published/Released September 2020

About

Overview

A New York Times Bestselling Author
A Winner of the Asian/Pacific American Award for Children’s Literature
A Newbery Medal-Winning Author

Prairie Lotus is a powerful, touching, multilayered book about a girl determined to fit in and realize her dreams: getting an education, becoming a dressmaker in her father’s shop, and making at least one friend. Acclaimed, award-winning author Linda Sue Park has placed a young half-Asian girl, Hanna, in a small town in America’s heartland, in 1880. Hanna’s adjustment to her new surroundings, which primarily means negotiating the townspeople’s almost unanimous prejudice against Asians, is at the heart of the story. Narrated by Hanna, the novel has poignant moments yet sparkles with humor, introducing a captivating heroine whose wry, observant voice will resonate with readers.

Age Range: 10-12 | Grade Level: 5-7 | Lexile Measure: 730L

Reviews

Customer Reviews

“In her latest middle-grade historical-fiction masterpiece, Park conjures the resourceful and industrious spirit of America’s westward expansion without ignoring the ugly veneer of racism. . . . An incredible and much-needed addition to the historical-fiction canon.”

— Booklist (starred)

“Strongly reminiscent of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s novels in its evocative, detailed depictions of daily frontier life. . . . [Hanna’s] painful experiences, including microaggressions, exclusion, and assault, feel true to the time and place, and Park respectfully renders Hanna’s interactions with Ihanktonwan women. An absorbing, accessible introduction to a troubled chapter of American history.”

— Publishers Weekly (starred)

“Fans of the Little House books will find many of the small satisfactions of Laura’s stories . . . here in abundance. Park brings new depth to these well-trodden tales, though, as she renders visible both the xenophobia of the town’s white residents, which ranges in expression from microaggressions to full-out assault, and Hanna’s fight to overcome it with empathy and dignity. . . . Remarkable.”

— Kirkus Reviews (starred)

“A sometimes uncomfortable yet triumphant story from the world of Little House on the Prairie told through a marginalized perspective; this is a must-read for middle grades and beyond.”

— School Library Journal (starred)