Thorndike Press

We Love You, Charlie Freeman

  • Kaitlyn Greenidge
  • Offered By:
  • ISBN-10: 1410492087
  • ISBN-13: 9781410492081
  • DDC: Fic
  • Shipping Weight: 1.10 lbs ( .50 kgs)
  • 432 Pages | Hardcover
  • Published/Released September 2016

This product is part of:

African-American - Large Print Standing Order Plan

Option Number: [2]

Captures the best works by bestselling, award-winning and popular African-American writers. Collection focuses on titles about relationships and experiences of African-Americans through the ages, told in a mixture of genres.

About

Overview

The Freeman family is invited to participate in a research experiment. They will live at the Toneybee Institute in rural Massachusetts with a young chimp abandoned by his mother. They will teach Charlie sign language and welcome him as a member of their family. But, isolated by their race and their situation, the Freemans come undone.

Reviews

Customer Reviews

“Greenridge’s wondrous first novel pits the sins of the past against the desire for the future in a multifaceted narrative that challenges concepts of culture and communication.”

— Booklist (starred)

“Greenidge proves herself a master of dialogue, which helps her craft engaging, well-drawn characters. . . . with humor, irony, and wit, Greenidge tackles this sensitive subject and crafts a light but deeply respectful take on this heavy aspect of America's treatment of black people. This is a timely work, full of disturbing but necessary observations. A vivid and poignant coming-of-age story that is also an important exploration of family, race, and history.”

— Kirkus Reviews

“. . . witty and provocative . . . Greenidge deftly handles a host of complex themes and characters, exploring not just how (literally) institutionalized racism is, but the difficulty of an effective response to it. . . . Greenidge doesn’t march to a pat answer; the power of the book is in her understanding of how clarity wriggles out of reach. For all the seriousness of its themes, though, Charlie Freeman is also caustically funny.”

— USA Today