Thorndike Press
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Why We Can't Sleep: Women's New Midlife Crisis

  • Ada Calhoun
  • Offered By:
  • ISBN-10: 1432881078
  • ISBN-13: 9781432881078
  • Shipping Weight: 1.15 lbs ( .52 kgs)
  • 406 Pages | Hardcover
  • Published/Released January 2021
  • Bestsellers

This product is part of:

Nonfiction - Large Print Standing Order Plan

Option Number: [3]

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About

Overview

A New York Times Bestseller
An Indie Next Pick
One of Vogue’s Best Books to Read this Winter
One of 10 Most Anticipated Books of 2020 by Forbes
Named One of Lit Hub’s Most Anticipated Books of 2020

Ada Calhoun found herself in the throes of a midlife crisis she was married with children and a good career. So why did she feel miserable? And why did it seem that other Generation X women were miserable, too? Speaking with women across America about their experiences as the generation raised to “have it all,” Calhoun found that most were exhausted, terrified about money, under-employed, and overwhelmed. Instead of being heard, they were told instead to lean in, take “me-time,” or make a chore chart to get their lives and homes in order. In Why We Can’t Sleep, Calhoun opens up the contexts of Gen X’s predicament and offers solutions for how to pull oneself out of the abyss.

Reviews

Customer Reviews

“Calhoun’s latest will be useful for those interested in feminist theory, especially insofar as it intersects with age and class, as well as a useful resource for people struggling to find balance in their personal and professional lives.”

— Library Journal (starred)

“[A] Bracing, empowering study . . . Women of every generation will find much to relate to in this humorous yet pragmatic account.”

— Publishers Weekly